Unmasked and Shameless

 

We all long to be fully loved and accepted. This quest for acceptance begins at birth and ideally is filled by our parents.

Often there is a lie that the enemy loves to plant in our minds: 'I must meet the standards others have set for me because otherwise I will be unlovable.' Have you ever struggled with this feeling or thought? Perhaps it comes out in thoughts like, 'I am insignificant' or 'I am flawed' or 'What I think or feel has no value'. Some of these thoughts may stem from parents, friends, even teachers and their words or actions toward you.

So many people in the world walk around wearing a mask. They are afraid to show their true selves and admit that they are not perfect, that they have messed up in the past and in the present. Often we allow our minds to spiral from those mistakes to the thought of being unlovable. Fear continues to sink in and shame keeps us quiet.

We are not meant to be in hiding or in shame. Jesus lived a life of love, placing it before anything else. In Psalm 103:13-14, we are reminded that "The Lord is like a father to his children, tender and compassionate to those who fear him. For he knows how weak we are; he remembers we are only dust." He provides His power to help us live the way He planned from the beginning - and that doesn't change when we make a mistake. We see that, through Jesus' sacrificial work on the cross, we can experience grace and love that covers a multitude of sins.

So how do we stand on the truth that we are loved?
- Begin to recognize the lies that enter your mind.
- Get in the word and find verses that speak to you on God's love and value for your life. When you sense lies rising up, speak these verses over your mind, heart, and soul until they begin to sink in. (i.e. John 3:16-18, Lamentations 3:22-23, Romans 5:6-9 and 8:15-16, 1 John 3:1, Psalm 103:8 and 11).
- Have grace for yourself. This new way of thinking takes time and won't happen in a day. You are on a journey of healing and partnering with God in the process!

By Jenae Hershberger

 
Jenae HershbergerComment